This Is The Kind Of Content That Our Brains Can Handle During The Pandemic

The pandemic has forced us to change a lot about our lives. The economic and emotional toll that has been dealt throughout this past year is tough to conceptualize. While some have taken to working out or cooking during the course of the year, the majority of us have looked for escapes. Our relationship with our screens has never been more important, providing entertainment and information when we need it most.

But what have we been watching? While some have been able to watch more movies and shows than ever before, others have looked for anything that triggers their nostalgia, while others stick to easy binges, like reality TV.

TheSoul Publishing conducted a survey of over 2,000 people, looking into their viewing habits during this past year and found that the majority of respondents were looking for content that was short and sweet. According to the survey, “Music videos (38%), comedy (36%), cooking or baking (33%), and DIY or crafting videos (29%) were the most frequently selected categories of short-form.”

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While short form video content has been on the rise over the past couple of years, the pandemic triggered a significant boom in this kind of viewing. Eight-four percent of audiences said they’d spent more or the same amount of time watching this kind of content during the pandemic, with people using these videos to cope with the challenges prompted by their new normal.

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“Nearly 30% of Americans stated that they watch positive online video content to improve their mood, while 26% said they watch for inspiration for ideas and projects and 19% said they watch to escape from the news of the day,” the survey found.

“It’s interesting to see that it’s not just any short-form video that’s resonating with the American audience right now. It’s really positive content that has taken the spotlight, becoming the popular form of escapism and a welcome source of entertainment,” said Victor Potrel, VP of Platform Partnerships at sur.

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Short form videos are becoming increasingly popular, from YouTube channels to TikTok viral clips. While this type of content, one that’s been made with an almost loose approach, has been a huge success, Hollywood’s response hasn’t been well received. Quibi, a streaming platform specializing in short form stories that boasted A-list actors and creatives was yanked just six months after its release this year.

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